Archives for April 2014

Five Tips for Saving Our Environment and Recycling Electronic Devices With ecoATM

I recently partnered with ecoATM to share important tips about saving our environment.  Today is Earth Day! To people who care about the environment, today marks the day to celebrate the earth and make a commitment to make lifetime changes to change our environmental impact.  Every year our family takes a look around our home and tries to find new ways to make the Earth a better place to live for our children.   On Earth Day I would also like to encourage you to take the initiative to  save our environment by recycling your unused electronics with ecoATM.

I recently checked out a local ecoATM and got instant cash for recycling my families unused electronics.   The kiosk was easy to use and provided many options for recycling phones, tables and mp3 players from various vendors.  It inspired me to take an inventory of all the electronics and accessories that are hidden in drawers and boxes around my home and recycle them.

 

Five Tips for Saving Our Environment and Recycling electronic devices with ecoATM:

1. Cash For Unused Devices:  Did you know that 57 percent of American device owners have idle cell phones in their homes, yet only 22 percent state they have previously recycled cell phones they no longer use.   ecoATM enables consumers to dispose of unused electronics responsibly by making recycling of old phones simple, fast & fun.  Simply places your device in the kiosk and obtain a quote for the best price for your device.  If you agree, ecoATM will dispense the cash immediately.

2. Location Location Location: There are about 900 kiosks located nationwide in local malls and surrounding areas. They are very easy to use and conveniently located.  Most transactions can be completed in 5-15 minutes.  You can find the nearest location online and get a preliminary quote.

3. Preparing Your Phone For Recycling:  Do you have an old iPod collecting dust around the home?  ecoATM also provides an option to recycle your unused mp3 and get cash to use towards a purchase of a new device.  Whether you are selling a phone, mp3 or tablet you should make sure to erase your personal data before visiting a local ecoATM.  If you are recycling an iPhone, make sure that you have deactivated iCloud and Find My iPhone on your device and  get instant cash payments as an incentive to recycle.

4: Trading in Devices that Don’t work:   Do you have a devices that doesn’t work?  No problem.  ecoATM is the world’s first automated eWaste recycling station, a friendly green machine looking to pay cash for the responsible recycling of your old cell phones, MP3 players and tablets.    It also has options to sell devices that are not working or dispose of unused electronics in a safe manner.

5. Recycling Unused Accessories:  ecoATM also has several options for disposing of unused accessories via the accessory bins on the side of the kiosk to keep them out of landfills or from languishing in desk drawers.  EcoATM can’t offer cash for these items, but offers a safe way to dispose of unused accessories.

 

With all your ecoATM transactions you also have the opportunity to donate towards a local nonprofit.  Have something different?  make sure to check out ecoATM for a complete list of over 4,000 devices.

Considering taking some time out of your day  on Earth Day to make a difference and recycle your old Tech Devices with ecoATM.

Disclosure:  This is a sponsored post in partnership with ecoATM and Smith New Media.  Thank you for supporting the brands that make Tech Food Life Magazine possible. As always, all thoughts are 100% my own. 

How To Sell Your Phone With eBay Sell My Phone

Disclosure:  This is a sponsored post in collaboration with eBay. However, all opinions are 100% my own.

Technology is changing every day, especially in the smartphone industry.  If you’re like me and  like to purchase the latest and greatest phone gadgets you may find yourself looking for ways to quickly recoup some of your money to  buy the next latest and greatest gadget, of course.  eBay Sell My Phone provides a resource to make money by selling your phone and is easy to use.

Here are five simple steps to sell your phone with eBay:

Five Steps To Sell Your Phone on eBAY with Sell My Phone

1. Take 3-5 High Quality Photos of Your Phone.  Place the phone on a table near natural sunlight and take a close up photo of the phone you are selling.  If you are including the accessories with your sale, consider taking a separate photo of the accessories as well and a photo of the phone with the accessories.   Make sure to untangle the chords and organize the prior to taking the photo.

2. Remove personal information from our phone. Prior to shipping the phone restore your phone to the factory defaults. Make sure to do this step first to ensure you don’t forget.

3. Find the Current Price of Your Phone.  Use eBay’s selling tool to check the selling price of your phone.  Be honest about the condition of the phone (ie Poor, Fair, Excellent) and phones memory (16GB, 32GB, 64GB, etc..).

4. List Your Phone. Select a price you want to sell your phone at.  You may want to open another browser window at this point to check the price of other phones that are similar to yours.  If you are in a hurry to sell you may want to consider the “Buy It Now” option.  However, depending on the type of phone and eBay’s Sell My Phone inventory you may get more  than the asking price.

5. Sell it & Get Paid   Within a couple of minutes you will start seeing bidders, sell your phone and receive your payment via PayPal.  Are you ready to sell your phone now, visit eBay Sell My Phone now.

eBay SmartPhone Price Comparison Infographic

 


 

Celebrating 365 Days of California Strawberries

Did you know that  nearly 90 percent of U.S.-grown fresh strawberries come from California, with more than 1.7 BILLION pounds being harvested annually – basically, if California were a country, it would be the world’s largest producer of strawberries!

I recently attended the 365 Days of California Strawberries Farm & Culinary Event and learned about the process of growing, cooking and  celebrating life with strawberries.    We enjoyed over 30 different appetizers and entrees made with fresh California Strawberries and toured a California Strawberries farm.  All our strawberry inspired recipes can be easily made at home.

California Strawberries Beach Side

We started off the festivities with a beachside gathering with strawberry appetizers and main dishes.  We had grilled salmon with fresh strawberry mango salsa , strawberry salad with berry dressing, chocolate dipped strawberries and strawberry shortcake.  Two of my favorites dishes were the strawberry gazpacho and strawberry mango salsa.  The gazpacho was light and delightfully sweet.  I also couldn’t resist getting second and third servings of the Mango Salsa with tortilla chips.

 

 

California Strawberries Farm Tour

The following day we headed out to a California Strawberries Farm for a hands on tour of a family owned and operated Strawberry Farm.   We walked through the strawberry fields, learned how to properly pick strawberries, touched and smelled the soil with our bare hands and ate fresh strawberries. We also learned about the hard work, discipline and dedication involved in farming Strawberries.

There are more than 400 strawberry farmers in California, many from multi-generational farming families who grow both conventional and organic strawberries. California grows more organic strawberries than any other place in the world.

Terry & Will Terry (L-R) – Father & Son – Terry Berries Strawberry Farmers

Our favorite multi-generational strawberry farm is Terry Berries Farm, the farm we toured.   Edgar Terry an Oxnard native and farmer was raised by a family that has farmed in Ventura, California since 1890. A fourth generation Californian, Edgar wanted to be a farmer since he was a child.   Edgar runs his family owned business, Terry Farms, Inc., alongside his wife of 29 years, Martha, who handles HR for the company. His son, William, handles the day-to-day farming activities, while his daughter manages employee compliance, hiring and food safety. Edgar’s brother runs the machine shop.  In addition to growing strawberries on 200 acres since 2002, Edgar grows a variety of crops, including celery, peppers, cilantro and spinach on about 2,000 acres of land.

 

California Strawberries Culinary Event

After our California Strawberries Farm tour we celebrated with more Strawberry inspired recipes.  Our specially prepared menu highlights the nutritional benefits and creatively prepared recipe ideas for  cooking with strawberries:

We enjoyed fresh herbs in farms cheese with stuffed strawberries rolled in pecan bacon.  Yes! Bacon.  These yummy appetizers were very savory.  The lacinto kale salad with strawberries, red grapes, spicy candied pecan & blue cheese was my favorite entree.

After enjoying the mountain views  for a couple minutes we enjoyed our next course, grilled chicken tacos with savory strawberry serrano, fire roasted corn, red onions, avocado salsa with ancho cheese.   We also savored a peanut butter, strawberry jam and bacon Kobe slider with waffle fries and strawberry ketchup.  The strawberry ketchup was delicious!

We ended our culinary experience with a strawberry shortcake popsicle and strawberries and ice cream.   It was truly one of the most amazing culinary experiences I have ever attended.  My palette is still dancing!

California Strawberries Nutritional FUN facts

  • Superfruit: 8 strawberries contain more vitamin C than an orange. Low in sugar, with only about 50 calories, strawberries are a great source of fiber, folate and potassium.
  • Stay smart with strawberries: According to a recent study, eating strawberries more than twice a week appears to delay cognitive aging by up to 2.5 years!
  • Good for your heart: Potassium found in strawberries can help control blood pressure and fight strokes. Plus, antioxidants, fiber and phytochemicals in strawberries have been shown to reduce total cholesterol levels.

 

The next time you buy and eat strawberries, I hope you remember my California Strawberries tour and consider creating nutritional strawberry inspired recipes to celebrate life. Make sure to visit California Strawberries for strawberry recipe ideas & additional tips.

I’m very thankful to California Strawberries for the opportunity to tour a California Strawberries farm and the Terry Family for sharing their love and passion for farming strawberries.

 

 

Disclosure:  I was invited by California Strawberries to tour a California Strawberries Farm.  All opinions are 100% my own.

 

Question:  What is your favorite strawberry inspired recipe?

MOLAA | Frida Kahlo Her Photos

I recently attended a preview of Frida Kahlo personal photos.  You can view the Frida Kahlo exhibit with over 200 of Frida’s personal photo collection through June 8, 2014 at the Museum of Latin American Art.

"My painting carries with it the message of pain.” - Frida Kahlo

"My painting carries with it the message of pain.” - Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo - I wish I could do whatever I liked behind the curtain of “madness”. Then: I’d arrange flowers, all day long, I’d paint; pain, love and tenderness, I would laugh as much as I feel like at the stupidity of others, and they would all say: “Poor thing, she’s crazy!” (Above all I would laugh at my own stupidity.) I would build my world which while I lived, would be in agreement with all the worlds. The day, or the hour, or the minute that I lived would be mine and everyone else’s - my madness wouldn't be an escape from “reality"

“I wish I could do whatever I liked behind the curtain of “madness”. Then: I’d arrange flowers, all day long, I’d paint; pain, love and tenderness, I would laugh as much as I feel like at the stupidity of others, and they would all say: “Poor thing, she’s crazy!” (Above all I would laugh at my own stupidity.) I would build my world which while I lived, would be in agreement with all the worlds. The day, or the hour, or the minute that I lived would be mine and everyone else’s - my madness would not be an escape from “reality”.” ― Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo - I remember the first time I was sick. I had gone to play with a boy, Luis Léon, and on the patio he threw a wooden log at my foot, and this was the pretext they used at home when my leg began to grow thin

I remember the first time I was sick. I had gone to play with a boy, Luis Léon, and on the patio he threw a wooden log at my foot, and this was the pretext they used at home when my leg began to grow thin

“Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything revolves, everything flies and goes away.” ― Frida Kahlo

Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to be light. Tragedy is the most ridiculous thing.” - Frida Kahlo

I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it's true I'm here, and I'm just as strange as you.” - Frida Kahlo

" I was fascinated by Papa’s studio. I would help him wash, crop and press photos and afterwards sell them, when we were poor. " - Frida Kahlo

She is gone now but her legacy will live on forever….

L4LL’s Dia Blog Hop with Author Rene Saldana

I am participating in the Latinas 4 Latino Literature  Día Blog Hop (L4LL’s Dia Blog Hop).   Established in the United States by poet and author Pat Mora, Día is a celebration of books and children. The month long program celebrates Latino Children literacy by pairing a different author or illustrator with a different blogger each day.  The 2nd annual blog hop has 24 authors/illustrators paired with 24 Latina bloggers.

I’m honored to be paired with Professor René Saldaña, Jr.  today.  His children and young adult books inspire us to pursue our dreams through passion, dedication and hardwork.  I can relate to many of the books he has written, especially, The Jumping Tree.  The book is a coming of age novel about the experiences Rene faces to become a young adult while living between Mexico and Texas.

I was raised in a bicultural home by a Latina mother who instilled the importance of  hardwork.  We celebrated the arts, literature and culture with our familia across the border.

Consider carving out some time in your day to follow the month long celebration at Latinas4LatinoLit.org Dia Blog Hop after reading today’s inspiring reflection.

REFLECTIONS by René Saldaña
FOR Latinas For Latino Literature

This morning in Lubbock, Texas, it rained. It’s such a big deal here when it does rain because it doesn’t happen often. A local news station even runs a sort of a pool, wherein viewers predict when we’ll get our first rain and they’ll win goodies in the form of paraphernalia from the TV station. I’ve yet to participate myself, but I’m happy somebody won because it means it’s rained.

We are several years into a drought in West Texas, which makes sense because we’re basically a desert out here. It’s bone dry, I tell you, and the local meteorologist occasionally will put up on the screen how much it would have to rain daily for us to catch up to normal levels. Though I get it that we’re so far behind, I’ve seen these numbers before, and I still can’t quite wrap my brain around how dire our situation.

So, this morning, there were puddles on the ground. And though I tell my own kids not to walk through them because they’ll ruin their shoes, they still do it, and inside, I smile. I smile because I know how fun it is to stomp on a puddle, making a big or small splash depending on the size of the puddles. I used to do it myself as a kid, against my mother’s wishes. Incidentally, she gave me the exact same reason why I shouldn’t plow through a puddle: I’ll ruin my shoes. And yet, today, inwardly, I smile when my own kids “ruin” their shoes that way. Because secretly, I wish I had the guts to do it still. But I’m an adult, and so I don’t.

What I do, though, is to look down into the puddles as I’m stepping over them, and I see my own reflection in them and that makes me happy. In the middle of this drought, puddles are so infrequent that I take any and every chance to see myself reflected in them. My reflection is precious in this format because it is as uncommon as the rain. You know what? I admit it: I’m so egotistical because I can’t get enough of myself in these puddles. I have to wonder: is it the reflection of myself that is attractive, the puddle, or both? I think it’s both.

Recently, Walter Dean Myers wrote in the New York Times (03/15/14) that there is a similar dearth within the publishing industry of books by writers of color about kids of color: books in which young readers might see themselves represented accurately and fairly: books in which young readers of color are “struck by the recognition of themselves in the story, a validation of their existence as human beings, an acknowledgement of their value by someone who understands who they are.” I’ve been arguing the same on behalf of young Latino/a readers for years now. So has Matt de la Peña in Arizona of late, where the powers that be have seen fit to do away with Mexican American studies, in essence rubbing out of existence Americans of Mexican descent by outlawing the culture’s literature. (For more on the subject of the futile attempt at the unmaking of a people, follow Tony Diaz, founder of Librotraficante, on The Huffington Post.)

When such titles appear on the scene, imagine the response on the part of young Latino/a readers at seeing their own reflections in the characters therein: they are validated, they see for themselves how they are very much a part of the American-Dream tapestry.

They will experience the same joy I do at first stomping a foot into a puddle, making a splash of indescribable proportions; second skipping over the puddles to see a flash of myself flying; and last, seeing myself clearly reflected back at me, not as stranger, not as other, not as illegal, but very much at home in my own skin, in my own story, in my own books.

Tonight, there is a hint of more rain in the air. A sort of coolness in the breeze. I’m waiting for the first sign of rain: the pitter-patter of drops on the skylight as I’m typing this. The prognostication for tomorrow says no rain, though. It’ll be dry, dusty, and windy, says the weatherman. But man, having seen myself in those puddles earlier in the day I’m comforted because for a brief moment today I saw myself in countless puddles and the next rain can’t be far off. So like our kids must who wait on the next book about them, I, too, will wait for the next storm. At first, I’ll wait patiently. And then anxiously. And then I’ll be out of my mind waiting. Mad like that because I’ve caught that clear reflection of myself in the puddles now, and I know how right that is, and how wrong the drought.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

René Saldaña, Jr., is an associate professor in the Language, Diversity, and Language Studies in the College of Education at Texas Tech University.

He is also the author of various titles for children and young adults, including The Jumping Tree, Finding Our Way: Stories, A Good Long Way, the Mickey Rangel bilingual detective/mystery series, among others.


In May, his first picture book will be published; it is a bilingual counting book that follows a boy on the day of his birthday fiesta. It is titled Dale, dale, dale: una fiesta de números/Hit It, Hit It, Hit It: A Fiesta of Numbers (Piñata Books).

He, his wife Tina, and their children Lukas, Mikah, Kalyn, and Jakob have adopted a puppy that they named Chito, after René’s pet dog from childhood.

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