MOLAA | Frida Kahlo Her Photos

I recently attended a preview of Frida Kahlo personal photos.  You can view the Frida Kahlo exhibit with over 200 of Frida’s personal photo collection through June 8, 2014 at the Museum of Latin American Art.

"My painting carries with it the message of pain.” - Frida Kahlo

"My painting carries with it the message of pain.” - Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo - I wish I could do whatever I liked behind the curtain of “madness”. Then: I’d arrange flowers, all day long, I’d paint; pain, love and tenderness, I would laugh as much as I feel like at the stupidity of others, and they would all say: “Poor thing, she’s crazy!” (Above all I would laugh at my own stupidity.) I would build my world which while I lived, would be in agreement with all the worlds. The day, or the hour, or the minute that I lived would be mine and everyone else’s - my madness wouldn't be an escape from “reality"

“I wish I could do whatever I liked behind the curtain of “madness”. Then: I’d arrange flowers, all day long, I’d paint; pain, love and tenderness, I would laugh as much as I feel like at the stupidity of others, and they would all say: “Poor thing, she’s crazy!” (Above all I would laugh at my own stupidity.) I would build my world which while I lived, would be in agreement with all the worlds. The day, or the hour, or the minute that I lived would be mine and everyone else’s - my madness would not be an escape from “reality”.” ― Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo - I remember the first time I was sick. I had gone to play with a boy, Luis Léon, and on the patio he threw a wooden log at my foot, and this was the pretext they used at home when my leg began to grow thin

I remember the first time I was sick. I had gone to play with a boy, Luis Léon, and on the patio he threw a wooden log at my foot, and this was the pretext they used at home when my leg began to grow thin

“Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything revolves, everything flies and goes away.” ― Frida Kahlo

Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to be light. Tragedy is the most ridiculous thing.” - Frida Kahlo

I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it's true I'm here, and I'm just as strange as you.” - Frida Kahlo

" I was fascinated by Papa’s studio. I would help him wash, crop and press photos and afterwards sell them, when we were poor. " - Frida Kahlo

She is gone now but her legacy will live on forever….

L4LL’s Dia Blog Hop with Author Rene Saldana

I am participating in the Latinas 4 Latino Literature  Día Blog Hop (L4LL’s Dia Blog Hop).   Established in the United States by poet and author Pat Mora, Día is a celebration of books and children. The month long program celebrates Latino Children literacy by pairing a different author or illustrator with a different blogger each day.  The 2nd annual blog hop has 24 authors/illustrators paired with 24 Latina bloggers.

I’m honored to be paired with Professor René Saldaña, Jr.  today.  His children and young adult books inspire us to pursue our dreams through passion, dedication and hardwork.  I can relate to many of the books he has written, especially, The Jumping Tree.  The book is a coming of age novel about the experiences Rene faces to become a young adult while living between Mexico and Texas.

I was raised in a bicultural home by a Latina mother who instilled the importance of  hardwork.  We celebrated the arts, literature and culture with our familia across the border.

Consider carving out some time in your day to follow the month long celebration at Latinas4LatinoLit.org Dia Blog Hop after reading today’s inspiring reflection.

REFLECTIONS by René Saldaña
FOR Latinas For Latino Literature

This morning in Lubbock, Texas, it rained. It’s such a big deal here when it does rain because it doesn’t happen often. A local news station even runs a sort of a pool, wherein viewers predict when we’ll get our first rain and they’ll win goodies in the form of paraphernalia from the TV station. I’ve yet to participate myself, but I’m happy somebody won because it means it’s rained.

We are several years into a drought in West Texas, which makes sense because we’re basically a desert out here. It’s bone dry, I tell you, and the local meteorologist occasionally will put up on the screen how much it would have to rain daily for us to catch up to normal levels. Though I get it that we’re so far behind, I’ve seen these numbers before, and I still can’t quite wrap my brain around how dire our situation.

So, this morning, there were puddles on the ground. And though I tell my own kids not to walk through them because they’ll ruin their shoes, they still do it, and inside, I smile. I smile because I know how fun it is to stomp on a puddle, making a big or small splash depending on the size of the puddles. I used to do it myself as a kid, against my mother’s wishes. Incidentally, she gave me the exact same reason why I shouldn’t plow through a puddle: I’ll ruin my shoes. And yet, today, inwardly, I smile when my own kids “ruin” their shoes that way. Because secretly, I wish I had the guts to do it still. But I’m an adult, and so I don’t.

What I do, though, is to look down into the puddles as I’m stepping over them, and I see my own reflection in them and that makes me happy. In the middle of this drought, puddles are so infrequent that I take any and every chance to see myself reflected in them. My reflection is precious in this format because it is as uncommon as the rain. You know what? I admit it: I’m so egotistical because I can’t get enough of myself in these puddles. I have to wonder: is it the reflection of myself that is attractive, the puddle, or both? I think it’s both.

Recently, Walter Dean Myers wrote in the New York Times (03/15/14) that there is a similar dearth within the publishing industry of books by writers of color about kids of color: books in which young readers might see themselves represented accurately and fairly: books in which young readers of color are “struck by the recognition of themselves in the story, a validation of their existence as human beings, an acknowledgement of their value by someone who understands who they are.” I’ve been arguing the same on behalf of young Latino/a readers for years now. So has Matt de la Peña in Arizona of late, where the powers that be have seen fit to do away with Mexican American studies, in essence rubbing out of existence Americans of Mexican descent by outlawing the culture’s literature. (For more on the subject of the futile attempt at the unmaking of a people, follow Tony Diaz, founder of Librotraficante, on The Huffington Post.)

When such titles appear on the scene, imagine the response on the part of young Latino/a readers at seeing their own reflections in the characters therein: they are validated, they see for themselves how they are very much a part of the American-Dream tapestry.

They will experience the same joy I do at first stomping a foot into a puddle, making a splash of indescribable proportions; second skipping over the puddles to see a flash of myself flying; and last, seeing myself clearly reflected back at me, not as stranger, not as other, not as illegal, but very much at home in my own skin, in my own story, in my own books.

Tonight, there is a hint of more rain in the air. A sort of coolness in the breeze. I’m waiting for the first sign of rain: the pitter-patter of drops on the skylight as I’m typing this. The prognostication for tomorrow says no rain, though. It’ll be dry, dusty, and windy, says the weatherman. But man, having seen myself in those puddles earlier in the day I’m comforted because for a brief moment today I saw myself in countless puddles and the next rain can’t be far off. So like our kids must who wait on the next book about them, I, too, will wait for the next storm. At first, I’ll wait patiently. And then anxiously. And then I’ll be out of my mind waiting. Mad like that because I’ve caught that clear reflection of myself in the puddles now, and I know how right that is, and how wrong the drought.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

René Saldaña, Jr., is an associate professor in the Language, Diversity, and Language Studies in the College of Education at Texas Tech University.

He is also the author of various titles for children and young adults, including The Jumping Tree, Finding Our Way: Stories, A Good Long Way, the Mickey Rangel bilingual detective/mystery series, among others.


In May, his first picture book will be published; it is a bilingual counting book that follows a boy on the day of his birthday fiesta. It is titled Dale, dale, dale: una fiesta de números/Hit It, Hit It, Hit It: A Fiesta of Numbers (Piñata Books).

He, his wife Tina, and their children Lukas, Mikah, Kalyn, and Jakob have adopted a puppy that they named Chito, after René’s pet dog from childhood.

Saddleback Bags How to Knock Off a Bag Misses The Mark

I read an article by Red Head Writing, How To Gracefully Deal With Haters.  Apparently, the owner of Saddleback bags has a lot of companies ripping off his bags. His response is a snarky video to show people how to rip off his bags. Making fun of Mexicans and depicting Mexicans in poor working conditions.

 

Initially, I thought it was kind of a smart way to respond. I took a look at the bags and admired the quality and even considered buying my husband and myself a bag.   However, after watching the video I was really offended by how he treated his employees and his statements that make fun of Domestic Violence at 11:20.  The photo above is the expression on his face when he is making the following remark:

“Knocking off this bag will be easier than beating your wife and kids, especially if you have a large family.”

I was born in Mexico and lived there for 10 years and still maintain my dual citizenship. I still have many family members who live and work in Mexico.  The video is very clever.  However, it misses the mark with these statements.   I am also concerned that Erika Napoletano a strategist & columist is backing this video as it makes fun of domestic violence & Mexicans. This video is not a graceful depiction of how to deal with haters.  It is the complete opposite.   If you are a social media strategist, please don’t ever encourage your clients to make a similar video.

I’m also concerned with what Dave Munson said as well.  Especially since he lived in Mexico!   The video could have been done without the statements at 11:20 and without depicting Mexicans in poor working conditions.

I went to Ericka’s Facebook page and Saddleback’s You Tube page to address my concern with no response from Saddleback.  Erika told me to take a look at the comments from others because according to viewers, I missed the mark.   Then she followed up her statement advising that maybe the brand isn’t for me.   She is correct, A brand that makes fun of domestic violence and takes jabs at Mexican culture is not for me.  In fact, it’s not for anyone.

Today, I’m writing a quick post to bring attention to this video and ask my fellow Latina and Latino Bloggers, Influencers and readers to take a look at the video and give me your honest opinion.

 


Additional Posts Referencing This Issue*

*Read the comments

FastCompany posted on Jan 15.

Saddleback How To Knock Off a Bag video Mexican Stereotypes

Tweets – Dated Jan 21

Question: Is this video offensive?  Are you also offended by the statements at 11:20?

Lo Que La Vida Me Robo Character Introduction and Giveaway

Disclosure:  This post was created in partnership with the Stiletto Blogger Network and Univision. However, all opinions expressed herein are my own. 

As I mentioned earlier this week, Univision recently announced their new telenovela,  ”Lo Que La Vida Me Robo”.  The Mexican telenovela will  capture your attention by telling the  story of  love, laughter, betrayal and wealth in the small town of aguazul.  The Mexican telenovela is also full of interesting characters that will keep you entertained.

I’m looking forward to the new novela and plan to use the Univision UVideos app to stay connected with the telenovela and host of characters.  Tune in to Lo Que La Vida Me Robo weekenights at 9pm on Univision. I recommend you check out the app or videos as well and download the app to get insider information on your favorite character too.

Can’t wait? You can find a  plethora of juicy clips to keep you busy on their dedicated novelas video page.  

Lo Que La Vida Me Robo unfolds in Aguazul, a picturesque village where Montserrat Mendoza, a socialite lives.   The telenovela scenes are surrounded my breathtaking architecture, design and views.

My favorite character is Nadia Medina Arguelles, a smart and distinguished socialite.  Nadia starts her married life full of hopes and expectations, but soon realizes she is trapped in a cold marriage.   Nadia desires to find love and seeks refuge in the arms of Victor Hernandez. Her close friend, Montserrat is willing to make any sacrifice for her family and is eventually manipulated by her mother, Graciela Giacinti, to marry a rich man.

The characters are involved in a classic love triangle and experience love, friendship, passion, contempt and resentment between them, because of secrets, betrayal and hatred caused by the greed and avarice of those around them.    Make sure to watch “Lo Que La Vida Me Robo” telenovela to find out Montserrat’s and Nadia’s fate.  The telenovela will have you on the edge of your seat every evening!

To celebrate the Telenovela, Univision is offering one of my readers a $50 American Express Card!  You have the opportunity to win it by participating in the giveaway below:

Giveaway

 
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Twitter Party Invite: #MyNovela “Lo Que La Vida Me Robó” Twitter Party with @Univision

Disclosure: I  partnered with Stilleto Media and Univision to host the #MyNovela Twitter Party featuring their novela, “Lo Que La Vida Me Robó” (Translation: What Life Took From Me).  All opinions are my own.

 

Do you like a good telenovela?  Univision recently announced their new telenovela,  “Lo Que La Vida Me Robo”.  The Mexican telenovela will  capture your attention by telling the  story of  love, laughter, betrayal and wealth in the small town of aguazul.  The Mexican telenovela is also full of interesting characters that will keep you entertained.

Univision also has the UVideos app to help you stay connected with the telenovela and host of characters.

On January 8, 2013 at 6pm PST, I will be cohosting a Twitter party.  We’ll kick off the New Year with a discussion about the telenovela characters and share  more information about the UVideos app.   You’ll also have the opportunity share your favorite #MyNovela character  and an opportunity to win $150 Univision Boutique Gift Cards!  You definitely don’t want to miss out.  Hope to see you there.

Tweet Chat Details:

What: #MyNovela Twitter Party

When: Wednesday, January 8th from 9-10pmEST/ 6pm-7pmPST

Where:  Twubs.com/MyNovela

Hashtag: #MyNovela

PRIZES: Five (5) winners will receive a $150 American Express Gift Card

Who to Follow:

Sponsor: @Univision

Moderators: @StilettoChat and @MsLatina

Co-Hosts: @ToughCookieMom, @Eva_Smith, @JaiMami @PattieCordova

RSVP HERE to participate:

Also, add #MyNovela to your Tweets during the scheduled time. Follow the Sponsor, Moderators and Hosts noted below. Also, use original tweets to respond to questions during the Twitter Party to be entered to win. Answers may be tweeted in English or Spanish.  Looking forward to tweeting with you!

 

HSF & Coca Cola Scholarships – $200,000 For College Bound Students #CokeForEducation

Disclosure:  This is not a sponsored post.  I am an advocate of higher education and support HSF’s initiatives to help Hispanic students further their education.

Did you know that Coca Cola and the Hispanic Scholarship Fund are offering $200,000 in scholarships to college bound Hispanic seniors to help close the college attainment gap among Latino students.

The Hispanic Scholarship Fund was founded in 1975.  HSF provides internships, mentoring opportunities and connects scholars with other organizations.   Each year HSF awards 150 types of scholarships and has administered over $400 million dollars in scholarships.  I had the honor of attending the Leaders in Educating Awards earlier this year and met  students and Hispanic Scholarship program alumni that have been helped by HSF Scholarships.

As part of the HSF & Coca-Cola “Share Possibilities/Comparte Possibilidades” Scholarship program, the grand prize winner will receive $20,000.  Four students will be awarded $10,000 and sixteen will receive $2,500.

What:

HSF & Coca-Cola Scholarship Program

When/Important Deadline:

December 15, 2013

Where to Apply:

www.Coke-HSF.com

Students are encouraged to share their profiles and gain community votes. Each eligible participating voter is automatically entered for a chance to win a $500 gift card and can vote up to five times a day.

HSF will select the scholarship recipients based on the Fund’s standard selection criteria for awarding scholarships, factoring in community votes gathered online. Final winners will be announced by May 2014.   Official rules can be found here.

Make sure to apply for the scholarships if you are a college bound Hispanic student or forward the information to someone you know who is a potential candidate.

In Support of Higher Education,

Free Virtual College Fair

Here are 2 great resources for  students and parents to prepare for the college application process.  Whether you are planning on attending a local college or out of state college the application process can sometimes be a time consuming process and stressful when you try to do everything on your own.    The first event is primarily in Spanish and is scheduled for October 10.  The second event is in English and scheduled for October 24.  Join the online conversation and obtain great resources to prepare your child to submit college applications, write essays, apply for financial aid and scholarships.

Virtual College Fair #1 – October 10 – 12pm-10pmEST

On Thursday October 10 from 12pm-10pm EST, over 100 colleges will gather together to participate in College Week Live to address the higher education needs of Hispanic students and their families.   Participants will be able to get access to expert advice on financial aid, tips on college study skills and participate in video chats with college admission representatives and students.

This is a great resource for parents who have children who is planning on attending college.

                

WHO
Hispanic/Latino Teens and their families

WHAT
Free Virtual College Fair as part of Univision’s Education Week

WHEN
Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013 at 12 p.m. – 10 p.m. ET

WHERE
www.eselmomento.com

AGENDA

Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013 (All Times Eastern)

12 p.m., How to Prepare for College: A Financial Aid Overview
Leslie Acosta-Martin, management and program analyst with Federal Student Aid (FSA) at the U.S. Department of Education.

1 p.m., Choosing a Major (in Spanish)
Elizabeth Romero, vice president of learning, New Futuro.

2 p.m., Admission Process
Adriana Flores, senior director, Diversity Initiatives at The College Board.

3 p.m., Excelencia in Education: Tracking Individual to National Latino College Success
Jose Cabrales, program manager at Excelencia in Education. 

4 p.m., I’m First – First Generation College Students
Chelsea Jones, student support associate at I’m First – Center for Student Opportunity.

5 p.m., The Gates Foundation – Academic Skills to Help You Succeed in College
Teresa Rivero, lead senior program officer at Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

6 p.m., Financial Aid
Eyra Perez, executive director of the San Antonio Education Partnership.

8 p.m., UC Davis Video Chat
N/A

9 p.m., ACT
Juan Garcia, assistant vice president – Strategic Partnership ACT.

 

 

Virtual College Fair #2 – October 24 – 10 am – 10pm EST

All Access October is one event that is highly recommended by CollegeWeekLive. There will be over 280 schools participating to discuss topics for seniors like writing and essay and finalizing your application process.  They will also provide tips to prepare for college entrance exams, narrowing your school list and more.

WHO
High School Juniors and Seniors and their families

WHAT
Free Virtual College Fair as part of College Week Live

WHEN
Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013 at 10a.m. – 10 p.m. ET

WHERE
http://www.collegeweeklive.com/en_CA/Guest/College-Events-October

AGENDA

10am, Why Letters of Recommendations are Important

11:30am, NCAA presents: Path to the Student-Athlete Experience

12:00pm, Three Skills to Minimize College Debt

1:00pm, The Who, What, When and Why of the Campus Visit

2:00pm, Choosing A College Based On Your Return on Investment

3:00pm, Indiana Tech Video Chat

FULL Schedule

Celebrating Latin BillBoard Music With A Playlist #SeHablaMusica

Music has always been a part of my life.  As a youth I danced in dance choreography and learned to use music and dance as a way to express my emotions and creativity.  As an adult I have taken dance lessons and enjoy Zumba fitness dance.  Last month  I watched and shared the Latin Billboard Finalist and Winners lists  and favorite performances.   Billboard Latino awards night went to Don Omar.  However, my favorite performances were Jenni Rivera Tribute and Marc Anthony.

 To celebrate the special music event Target provided me with a giftcard to share my love of music and favorite artist from Latin Billboard.    One of the reasons I  love watching music awards is to watch my favorite singers come under one roof to celebrate their love of music.   It’s also a great opportunity to gather with family and create a list of new artists to add to my iphone playlist.


Content and/or other value provided by our partner, Target. 

Music and dance are a part of my life and will always be a part of my life.  Regardless of your age, we can all celebrate life with some rhythmic latin tunes.  I really can’t imagine my life without music… Could you?

Here is a playlist with the songs from my favorite performers I made for my Zumba dance fitness.  Hope you enjoy it.

 

Giveaway

To celebrate latin music, Target has also graciously offerred one of my readers a $25 Gift card.   Please follow the instructions to enter to win.

 

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Disclosure:  This is a sponsored post in partnership with Target.  However, all opinions are my own.

 

Celebrating Hispanic Scholarship Fund Leaders In Education Awards 2013 #LEA2013

 

I had the opportunity to attend the Hispanic Scholarship Fund Leaders In Education Awardsin Los Angeles, CA on Thursday, April 18.  The event is hosted by Hispanic Scholarship Fund, the nation’s largest not-for-profit organization supporting Hispanic higher education.   The 3rd annual Leaders In Education recognized Southern California students, parents, schools, teachers and other leaders which are making a difference in Hispanic Education and raises awareness to the work HSF has done to highlight the contributions of leaders in Education.

 

Congratulations to Leaders In Education Awards 2013 Winners

School of the Year – Ánimo Leadership Charter High School
Male Student of the Year – Ariel Salazar (Presented by Toyota)
Female Student of the Year – Barbie Aguilar (Presented by Toyota)
President & CEO Hispanic Scholarship Fund – Fidel A. Vargas
Educator of the Year – Teresa Carreto
Parent of the Year – Lorena Aguilar
Volunteer/Mentor of the Year – Oscar Ayon (Presented by Musician Christian Chavez)

 

 

We were honored to meet  Oscar Ayon is President / Co-founder of Unidos Por La Música.   Oscar Ayon has built a successful life and career and has given back to the community through various charitable programs.  Unidos Por La Music is a non-profit with a mission to provide university scholarships, medical grants and hunger relief efforts by creating musical charitable events to benefit those in need.  His community outreach programs “Bags of Hope”, also provided bags of groceries to needy families and fed over 66,00 children and families in the Inland Empire. 

 

We also met the President and CEO of Hispanic Scholarship Fund Fidel Vargas.  An HSF Alumni, he shared that there were 85,000 HSF applicants last year. Out of the 85,000 applicants  25,000 students qualified, However only 5,000 received awards.   His goal is to take Hispanic Scholarship Fund to the next level by raising more funds to provide scholarships for students in need.  He recalls receiving the scholarship funds as a student in Harvard.  One year it provided academic support to be able to save to buy a ticket to come home during the holidays and another year a warm coat during winter.  Several alumni shared testimonials on the difference the HSF scholarships also made in their lives.

Nely Galan at Hispanic Scholarship Fund Leaders in Education Awards 2013

The fundraising festivities were kicked off with an Adam Rodriguez interactive video encouraging participants to text a pledge to Hispanic Scholarship Fund.  An overwhelming response and support was provided by the attendees and sponsors to raise over $79,000 in just a couple hours.  Hispanic Scholarship Fund will have additional initiatives to raise awareness on the importance of supporting higher education.

 

The overwhelming amount of students in need of scholarships made me wonder how many other lives have been changed by Hispanic Scholarship Funds and also prompted me to ask  fellow Latina Leader Network members  to share their testimonials.

Stephanie Bravo, Founder of StudentMentor.org is a  Hispanic Scholarship Fund Alumni.   She received an HSF Scholarship during 2009-2010 academic year. HSF was able to help her in a time when she needed the most financial help since it was the first time she moved away from home to pursue medical school. It lessened her financial burden by helping her pay for academic and living expenses.   After graduating Stephanie was able to  revitalize her medical school’s chapter of the Latino Medical Student Association’s Mentorship Program, which pairs premedical students with medical student mentors to encourage them to become doctors.  She wanted to make a bigger difference and cofounded StudentMentor.org — a national nonprofit organization helping students collaborate with mentors. In less than 3 years, she has been able to help more than 10,000 students achieve their academic and career goals through StudentMentor.org.  Not only has Hispanic Scholarship Fund influenced her whole new career in higher education, but it keeps her engaged in her passion of mentoring as a mentor in HSF’s First Year Transition Program and is paying it forward.

These success stories are an example of Hispanic Scholarship Fund’s  commitment of not only putting a college degree in every Latino household, but to propel Latinos to successfully attain the highest levels of education.  For detailed honoree bios visit the Hispanic Scholarship Fund website at http://www.hsf.net/lea2013honorees.aspx and follow the conversation on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/HispanicScholarshipFund.

 

Disclosure:   This is a sponsored post with Smith New Media and Hispanic Scholarship Fund.  However, all opinions are my own.

 

Question:  Which Hispanic Scholarship Fund success story resonated with you?  Why is it important to help fund Hispanic Education?  What is our responsibility to others pursuing higher education?

Beef Empanadas Recipe

Empanadas name comes the Spanish verb Empanar which means to wrap or coat with bread.  The traditional hearty pastry  is made by folding a thin circular shaped dough over the stuffing and are served as street food in the Carribbean, Phillipines, Puerto Rico and Latin America.  The traditional empanada is prepared with fish or chicken.

I enjoy making empadas in bulk and serving them as a simple meal.   I also store the rest in the refrigerator to eat as an on the go snack or as a quick meal.

 

Ingredients
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 pound ground beef steak
1/4 pound fresh chorizo
3/4 cup finely chopped onion
2 cloves finely chopped garlic
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 package store-bought pie crust or your favorite pie crust recipe
1 egg

 

Directions
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.  In a medium-sized skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the beef, chorizo, onion, garlic, cumin, salt and pepper. Cook for 8 to 11 minutes, stirring constantly to  blend ingredients. Set aside and let the filling cool.

Roll out the pie crust dough and cut out rounds using a 3-inch cutter. Put 1 tablespoon of filling on half of the round. Fold the other half of the round over and using a fork, press down on the edge of the dough making sure it is sealed all the way around. This forms the empanada. Whisk the egg in a small bowl. Brush the top of each empanada with the egg wash. Arrange the empanadas on a nonstick sheet pan and bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Transfer the empanadas to a serving platter and serve.

 

Buen Provecho!

 

 

 

 

Question:  What filling do you like in your empanadas? 

 

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